Contributors

Volume XXV, Spring 2015

Kelly M. Bryant is a writing/reading coach at Davidson County Community College. She graduated from the Master of Arts in Leadership in Student Affairs program from the University of St. Thomas-Minnesota in May 2014. She studied abroad in Scotland while an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. Kelly has also traveled to England, Wales, Ireland, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, and Canada. Her interests in research include study abroad, student development, and student diversity and inclusion.

Brett Dixon is a doctoral student in the Department of Leadership, Policy and Adult and Higher Education at North Carolina State University.

Mark Engberg is Associate Professor and Program Chair, Higher Education at Loyola University Chicago. His research agenda focuses on how individual- and institutional-level factors influence students’ pathways to postsecondary education, with a particular focus on racial/ethnic minorities and low-income students, and on understanding the educational benefits of diversity and how different curricular and co-curricular interventions influence a range of skills and dispositions necessary in today’s increasingly diverse and global society.

Jennifer I. Hathaway is an Assistant Professor of Reading at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests include the development of teachers’ beliefs, teacher education, and professional development for teachers.

T.J. Jourian is a Ph.D. candidate in Higher Education at Loyola University of Chicago. He is Managing Editor of the Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs.

Adriana L. Medina is an Associate Professor of Reading at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests include adolescents who struggle with literacy, teacher education, and educational program evaluation.

Amy Muse is an associate professor of English at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. A former Fulbright scholar in Greece, since 2004 she has been directing study abroad courses in Greece and has also co-led courses in Turkey. In 2013 she presented at the Forum’s Standards of Good Practice Institute on Curriculum, Teaching, and Education Abroad at the University of Minnesota.

Paola Pilonieta is an Associate Professor of Reading at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests include teacher education and early literacy, in particular comprehension instruction.

Peggy Retka is the Director of Education Abroad at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University, Collegeville, MN.

Krista M. Soria is a research analyst with the Office of Institutional Research at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include learning more about the effects of participation in high-impact educational practices osn college students’ development and engagement; college students’ leadership development; and social class in higher education.

Allison J. Spenader is an Associate Professor of Education at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University, Collegeville, MN. Allison teaches World Languages and English as a Second Language Pedagogy courses.

Michael K. Walonen is a professor specializing in transatlantic modern and contemporary cultural studies, postcolonial studies, and world literature at Bethune-Cookman University. He is the author of the book Writing Tangier in the Postcolonial Transition: Space and Power in Expatriate and North African Literature and articles that have appeared in the journalsInterdisciplinary Literary Studies, Studies in Travel Writing, African Literature and Culture, and African Studies Quarterly, as well as the collections Geocritical Explorations and On and Off the Page: Mapping in Text and Culture. He currently teaches at Bethune-Cookman University.

Jeffrey R. Watson is Chair of Linguistics and Language Acquisition in the Center for Languages, Cultures, and Regional Studies and Assistant Professor of Russian at the U.S. Military Academy – West Point, New York.

Richard L. Wolfel is Chair of Cross-Cultural Competence in the Center for Languages, Cultures, and Regional Studies and Associate Professor of Geography at the U.S. Military Academy – West Point, New York.

Feng Xiao received his Ph.D. in Second Language Acquisition from Carnegie Mellon University. He will be an Assistant Professor of Asian Languages and Literatures at Pomona College in the fall of 2015. His research interests are interlanguage and intercultural pragmatics, technology-enhanced learning, and statistical language learning.